an interview, a backyard, and of course, a trampoline.
Here’s an interview I did for School Library Journal plus a few photos from the backyard. Forget the books – look at the blood, sweat and tears in the paint job on that cubby house…So nice talking to Angela Carstensen, and a great hour or two with James Horan. Check out his latest (and brilliant) photo exhibition, ‘Irish Horse’, here:
http://www.australianphotography.com/news/head-on-exhibition-irish-horse
As for what to take out of this interview?
I’m so glad one of my dogs ate all the protective crap around the trampoline…

an interview, a backyard, and of course, a trampoline.

Here’s an interview I did for School Library Journal plus a few photos from the backyard. Forget the books – look at the blood, sweat and tears in the paint job on that cubby house…So nice talking to Angela Carstensen, and a great hour or two with James Horan. Check out his latest (and brilliant) photo exhibition, ‘Irish Horse’, here:

http://www.australianphotography.com/news/head-on-exhibition-irish-horse

As for what to take out of this interview?

I’m so glad one of my dogs ate all the protective crap around the trampoline…

THE FAILURIST

Here’s the talk I did as part of TEDxSydney back in April. It was a huge honour to be part of it, and to speak at the Sydney Opera House as well. Some things are just that little bit more special when they happen in your home town.

The original title was The Joys of Failure. You might notice how scared I was of stepping on that round red rug! Not much different from the discus circle I confronted as an eight year-old (as spoken about in the talk).

I have to admit – I walked off stage and knew exactly how to make it better next time, if there is a next time. I’m starting to learn that experiences like these are the training ground for the next one, just as every book is its own challenge, but also the necessary practise for books to come.

Lastly, it’s true what I said – when I sit down I do want there to be some failure in the air, or else what’s the point? Every book I’ve every written has been better for the failures within the writing. And for arriving back at the desk.

What’s a few men? Sad but gorgeous goodbye from Hunters&Collectors last Friday night at the Enmore. Thanks for a few decades of iconic music to write to. Yes, the Peter Garrett-Jim Moginie cameo was massive, but Talking to a Stranger, This Morning and The Slab were the treasures to have and hold for life. Also great to have one last raucous chant of “YOU DON’T MAKE ME FEEL LIKE I’M A WOMAN ANYMORE!!!” from a chorus of a thousand women and MEN. Thanks you blokes from the garden state. @_hcofficial

What’s a few men? Sad but gorgeous goodbye from Hunters&Collectors last Friday night at the Enmore. Thanks for a few decades of iconic music to write to. Yes, the Peter Garrett-Jim Moginie cameo was massive, but Talking to a Stranger, This Morning and The Slab were the treasures to have and hold for life. Also great to have one last raucous chant of “YOU DON’T MAKE ME FEEL LIKE I’M A WOMAN ANYMORE!!!” from a chorus of a thousand women and MEN. Thanks you blokes from the garden state. @_hcofficial

When Dogs Cry vs Getting the Girl

Question: These books seem to both be the third book in the Cameron Wolfe / Underdogs / Wolfe Brothers Series (#WolfeBooks)… Why do they have different titles? Are they the same book?

AnswerWhen Dogs Cry and Getting the Girl are the same book – but they’re not. The third book of the Wolfe trilogy, I called it When Dogs Cry here in Australia, but once it was accepted by an American publisher, changes were requested.

At the time, I was still desperate to be published internationally and agreed to explore one major change in the book. It was a change that would take it on a different course to arrive at almost an identical ending. I also agreed to look at a possible change of title. 

Basically, in When Dogs Cry, Cameron and Ruben Wolfe remain best of friends throughout. In Getting the Girl, they have a falling out. This does take the book in a different direction, but the final chapter, where Cameron carries Rube home, is essentially the same.

As for the title, I do have regrets about the whole episode, but I don’t spend long on them at all. On the whole, it was a great learning curve. The rewrite helped me see how many options there are available to a writer. I also realised that whilst it was a hugely valuable experience, I would try not to let it happen again.

writing and… FIGHTING: RAGING BULL

Where to begin with Raging Bull, from the stunning opening sequence with De Niro in his leopard pattern bathrobe - skipping, dancing and shadowboxing in the ring to the tune of Mascagni. When I first saw it, I thought he was alone…It was an empty gym he was training in (despite the robe) - it just looks so lonely, and the music creates that cavernous sense of solitude…and then we hear the bell ring, and with it - the crowd. He’s not alone…and then we realise. Yes he is. Despite everything. You’re always alone in the ring.

   It’s how writing is too, I guess, but the bruises don’t always show.

   Weirdly, the other lasting moment I recall time and time again - possibly from yelling at my own kids at the dinner table - is when Joe Pesci threatens his son for misbehaving during dinner: “DO THAT AGAIN AND I’M STABBING YOU WITH MY FORK!”

   And then the colour scenes - the montages of weddings and years passing by. And those circular fight scenes. Creating something like that…they must have felt like they were making dynamite.